Celticsprite’s Blog


Galician and Asturian Celtic Leagues in the ‘80s

The Place: Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Year: 1986.

After my launching of the memorable Fahy Club Celtic Festival in 1985, I began to contact some of the young Celtic devotees I knew in order to gather ourselves under some sort of league. We then established the “Royal Celtic Association of Galician Pipers”, and decided to get in contact with The Celtic League, International Branch. By those days we yearn for the recognition of Northern Spain Galicia and Asturias autonomies as Celtic nations. Their secretary at that time was the late Alan Heusaff, (1921 – 1999) “Breton nationalist, linguist, dictionary compiler, prolific journalist and lifetime campaigner for solidarity between the Celtic peoples. A co-founder of The Celtic League in 1961, he was its first General Secretary until 1984”, an outstanding Celticist through which we soon found echo of our aims.

It was Mr. Heusaff himself who helped us contacting similar associations in Northern Spain by publishing one of our letters on their Carn Magazine .

Thanks to it we were soon contacted from Galicia by the “Liga Celtica da Galiza” (Celtic League of Galicia) which led later into the Irmandade Cetiga” (Celtic Brotherhood), and from Asturias by the “Lliga Celta d’Asturies” (Celtic League of Asturias). Hereby you may find the scan of their badges. The “Royal Celtic Association of Galician Pipers” badge is a design of the Argentine Manuel Castro. The “Irmandade Celtiga” badge is a design of the Galician Biel, artist responsible of some designs for the folk band “Luar Na Lubre” in the ‘80s.

We decided to work together for our recognition and subsequently passed forward our whole petitions (both Argentine and Spanish) unto their Annual Meeting in 1987, on behalf of Mr.Heusaff.

Unluckily we couldn’t convince them to enter the League as Celtic Nations, since they have always argued we had no “Celtic language”, basic requirement stated in their constitution and highly connected with the present concept of “nation”.

Anyway they recognized our Celtic heritage and offered us the status of associated member countries, which we rejected since it didn’t allow us to vote at the meetings. Ironically, though the Celtic League keeps on struggling, a large percent of the people living in the six official nations does not speak nor write on their own Celtic languages; just to cite an example, in Ireland, “Gaelic” is the official language but employed only by a short percent of the Irish population.

Unluckily “Celtic Nation” is still a term used to describe some territories in northwest Europe in which their own Celtic languages and cultural traits have largely survived. The term “nation” is used in this context to mean a group of people associated with a particular territory who share a common identity, language or culture, and is not synonymous with “country” or “state”.

Even though Galicia and Asturias have common items either in archaeology or cultural aspects, even though Galicia and Asturias have a large number of celtic words in their language, even though Galicia and Asturias have petroglyphs and dolmens similar to those found in Ireland ,Wales, and Brittany, still stand as Non Celtic Nations in concept, but for me and many others, this only applies for books and lectures, not to the beating heart and soul of their people.



Galician and Asturian Celtic Leagues in the ‘80s

The Place: Buenos Aires, Argentina; the Year: 1986.

After my launching of the memorable Fahy Club Celtic Festival in 1985, I began to contact some of the young Celtic devotees I knew in order to gather ourselves under some sort of league. We then established the “Royal Celtic Association of Galician Pipers”, and decided to get in contact with The Celtic League, International Branch. By those days we yearn for the recognition of Northern Spain Galicia and Asturias autonomies as Celtic nations. Their secretary at that time was the late Alan Heusaff, (1921 – 1999) “Breton nationalist, linguist, dictionary compiler, prolific journalist and lifetime campaigner for solidarity between the Celtic peoples. A co-founder of The Celtic League in 1961, he was its first General Secretary until 1984”, an outstanding Celticist through which we soon found echo of our aims.

It was Mr. Heusaff himself who helped us contacting similar associations in Northern Spain by publishing one of our letters on their Carn Magazine .

Thanks to it we were soon contacted from Galicia by the “Liga Celtica da Galiza” (Celtic League of Galicia) which led later into the Irmandade Cetiga” (Celtic Brotherhood), and from Asturias by the “Lliga Celta d’Asturies” (Celtic League of Asturias). Hereby you may find the scan of their badges. The “Royal Celtic Association of Galician Pipers” badge is a design of the Argentine Manuel Castro. The “Irmandade Celtiga” badge is a design of the Galician Biel, artist responsible of some designs for the folk band “Luar Na Lubre” in the ‘80s.

We decided to work together for our recognition and subsequently passed forward our whole petitions (both Argentine and Spanish) unto their Annual Meeting in 1987, on behalf of Mr.Heusaff.

Unluckily we couldn’t convince them to enter the League as Celtic Nations, since they have always argued we had no “Celtic language”, basic requirement stated in their constitution and highly connected with the present concept of “nation”.

Anyway they recognized our Celtic heritage and offered us the status of associated member countries, which we rejected since it didn’t allow us to vote at the meetings. Ironically, though the Celtic League keeps on struggling, a large percent of the people living in the six official nations does not speak nor write on their own Celtic languages; just to cite an example, in Ireland, “Gaelic” is the official language but employed only by a short percent of the Irish population.

Unluckily “Celtic Nation” is still a term used to describe some territories in northwest Europe in which their own Celtic languages and cultural traits have largely survived. The term “nation” is used in this context to mean a group of people associated with a particular territory who share a common identity, language or culture, and is not synonymous with “country” or “state”.

Even though Galicia and Asturias have common items either in archaeology or cultural aspects, even though Galicia and Asturias have a large number of celtic words in their language, even though Galicia and Asturias have petroglyphs and dolmens similar to those found in Ireland ,Wales, and Brittany, still stand as Non Celtic Nations in concept, but for me and many others, this only applies for books and lectures, not to the beating heart and soul of their people.



Memorable Data: The 1997 Welsh Bardic Festival in Patagonia -( 1997)
June 19, 2009, 10:14 pm
Filed under: Celtic Culture, Memorable Data, Memorable Pics
On October of 1997 I was invited to play gaelic harp by the Welsh Community in Patagonia. It was during the Eisteddfod celebrations which are held since inmigration times by the year 1865 in Argentina. I was honoured to play within the Bardic Circle, a rare and unique invitation since it was the first and only occasion that a harp was played for this ceremony when the new archdruid is elected. Eisteddfod means “to be sit down” referring to the bardic chair where the elected archdruid and winner of the welsh cultural competition in crowned. Above: Bardic Chair at the Welsh Museum in the town of Gaiman, Chubut, Argentina.

Flyer and Program issued for the event including details of the Festival and artists

Decalogue of the Patagonian Eistedvod
1 – Chubut Eistedvod literary festival is a musical celebration that launched the Welsh settlers in the last quarter of the nineteenth century.
2 – If you participate in the Eistedvod you are enjoying the oldest cultural tradition of the province.
3 – The commission of the Eistedvod, which you may be contacted either verbally or in writing, would welcome any suggestions or constructive criticism to help improve the organization and development of the festival.
4 – Each assistant to the Eistedvod has learned its location. Try to stay in their own and recognize the right of others to occupy the place assigned to it.
5 – You are not obliged to remain in the hall. Take advantage of small intervals in order to enter and exit.
6 – The hall needs place and free passage for participants and competitors. Do not obstruct the forming circle.
7 – Recitations, singing,and the verdicts need the silence of the public, which is a sign of respect towards the work of others.
8 – Young children are the future gozadores of Eistedvod. Do not let that become your current discomfort.
9-By the Eistedvod, you agree to its rules. Heed the verdicts of the jury because they have a teaching function.
10 – Registration is available in a competition to win or lose. But it is above all a manifestation of love in various forms of culture.

Shield of the Eistedvod of Chubut. The work is the result of a contest sponsored by the Festival Organizing Committee. Argentina holds the colors in the center of a stylized daffodil, national flower of Wales. The name of the province of Chubut, under the prominently druidic symbol, who had always chaired this festival .

Review on the Festival from a local Chubut Paper & Award Medallion designed for this occasion



Memorable Data: The 1997 Welsh Bardic Festival in Patagonia -( 1997)
June 19, 2009, 10:14 pm
Filed under: Celtic Culture, Memorable Data, Memorable Pics
On October of 1997 I was invited to play gaelic harp by the Welsh Community in Patagonia. It was during the Eisteddfod celebrations which are held since inmigration times by the year 1865 in Argentina. I was honoured to play within the Bardic Circle, a rare and unique invitation since it was the first and only occasion that a harp was played for this ceremony when the new archdruid is elected. Eisteddfod means “to be sit down” referring to the bardic chair where the elected archdruid and winner of the welsh cultural competition in crowned. Above: Bardic Chair at the Welsh Museum in the town of Gaiman, Chubut, Argentina.

Flyer and Program issued for the event including details of the Festival and artists

Decalogue of the Patagonian Eistedvod
1 – Chubut Eistedvod literary festival is a musical celebration that launched the Welsh settlers in the last quarter of the nineteenth century.
2 – If you participate in the Eistedvod you are enjoying the oldest cultural tradition of the province.
3 – The commission of the Eistedvod, which you may be contacted either verbally or in writing, would welcome any suggestions or constructive criticism to help improve the organization and development of the festival.
4 – Each assistant to the Eistedvod has learned its location. Try to stay in their own and recognize the right of others to occupy the place assigned to it.
5 – You are not obliged to remain in the hall. Take advantage of small intervals in order to enter and exit.
6 – The hall needs place and free passage for participants and competitors. Do not obstruct the forming circle.
7 – Recitations, singing,and the verdicts need the silence of the public, which is a sign of respect towards the work of others.
8 – Young children are the future gozadores of Eistedvod. Do not let that become your current discomfort.
9-By the Eistedvod, you agree to its rules. Heed the verdicts of the jury because they have a teaching function.
10 – Registration is available in a competition to win or lose. But it is above all a manifestation of love in various forms of culture.

Shield of the Eistedvod of Chubut. The work is the result of a contest sponsored by the Festival Organizing Committee. Argentina holds the colors in the center of a stylized daffodil, national flower of Wales. The name of the province of Chubut, under the prominently druidic symbol, who had always chaired this festival .

Review on the Festival from a local Chubut Paper & Award Medallion designed for this occasion



Memorable Data: POITIN–CELTIC GROUP- (1988) – “Original Analog Cassette Covers"
June 19, 2009, 9:53 pm
Filed under: Memorable Data, Memorable Pics, Mp3 Downloads
Hi to all… I would like to share with you the covers of the original 1988 “Poitín” release issued on analog cassette tape. This album is the “first celtic recording” ever done in Argentina, including original and traditional tunes and lyrics accompanied by gaelic harp.


Related Post: POITIN –CELTIC GROUP- (1988) – “20TH ANNIVERSARY DIGITAL REMASTERED EDITION” (PROMO ALBUM)



Memorable Data: POITIN–CELTIC GROUP- (1988) – “Original Analog Cassette Covers"
June 19, 2009, 9:53 pm
Filed under: Memorable Data, Memorable Pics, Mp3 Downloads
Hi to all… I would like to share with you the covers of the original 1988 “Poitín” release issued on analog cassette tape. This album is the “first celtic recording” ever done in Argentina, including original and traditional tunes and lyrics accompanied by gaelic harp.


Related Post: POITIN –CELTIC GROUP- (1988) – “20TH ANNIVERSARY DIGITAL REMASTERED EDITION” (PROMO ALBUM)



Memorable Pics: Robin Williamson (1983) Music for the Mabinogi
May 27, 2009, 6:17 pm
Filed under: Memorable Pics, Robin Williamson
Hi to all. Hereby I am posting this cute B & W photograph by Janet Williamson used as a promo for Robin Williamson’s Mabinogi album. By those days Janet was the one who undertook the design and photography of the whole project. It is to notice that she also used to published her drawings on some of Robin’s books, covers, and flyers.
I scanned this pic at 768×971 pixel size – 24bpp
Janet Williamson – All rights reserved – (1983)