Celticsprite’s Blog


Summer Solstice Session

As you may already know, The Séamus Ennis Cultural Centre is a small, non-profit Arts organisation presently promoting their Summer Solstice Session festival as part of The Gathering 2013. Any help and support you can give by sharing the event info is greatly appreciated and we hope to see you in Naul over the weekend of June 21st to 23rd too!

Many thanks from everyone at The Séamus Ennis Cultural Centre,

Share this Gathering!

Thank you for your support and we look forward to seeing you there!
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About this Gathering

A boutique mid-Summer festival, celebrating the heritage, history, community and culture of rural Fingal, and the legacy of Master Uilleann Piper & Folklore Archivist, Séamus Ennis
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Friday June 21st

4:00pm – Try The Uilleann Pipes
To coincide with National Music Day – Love:Live Music Ireland, come along and Try the Uilleann Pipes with instructors from Na Píobairí Uilleann, the Uilleann Pipers.

Detailed information and booking is available on our website.
Admission is FREE but booking is essential to ensure your place.
_______________________ Saturday June 22nd

Celebrating the life and work of Internationally renowned Folklore Archivist & Musician, Séamus Ennis

11:00am – Féidlim Tonn Rí’s Castle – Visual storytelling through the music and stories of Séamus Ennis
Bringing to life some of the characters from Séamus Ennis’ 1977 recording for Claddagh Records, ‘Feidlim Tonn Rí’s Castle’, learn to create your own character using pencil and paper with instruction as you sketch.
Watch as the artist, Christan Kotey, creates a painting depicting a scene of Irish fireside tales to the soundtrack of the original Claddagh Records recording.
Detailed information and booking is available on our website.
Admission is FREE but booking is essential to ensure your place.

2:00pm – The Ennis Trail – A Multimedia Presentation by Michael Lydon
On January 13th, 1951, the famous American folklorist, or ‘song-hunter’, Alan Lomax arrived in Ireland to collect material for an album that would become the first LP of Irish traditional music, ‘The World Library of Folk and Primitive Music: Volume II Ireland’. Under advice from George Moore of the BBC, Lomax recruited the great Séamus Ennis, at that point already an established folklorist, to act as his guide. The journey they took visiting villages across Ireland, recording singers and musicians, would later be referred to as ‘The Ennis Trail’, a journey that when examined today, offers a fascinating insight into Irish traditional music.
Detailed information and booking is available on our website.
Admission is FREE but booking is essential to ensure your place.

8:30pm – Séamus Ennis Tribute Concert – Celebrating the sustaining influence of Séamus Ennis’ work on generations of Irish musicians 
Featuring Conor McKeon, Dermot McLaughlin & Paddy Glackin

Detailed information and booking is available on our website.
Tickets are limited, please book early to avoid disappointment.

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Sunday June 23rd

Summer Solstice Session on the Village Square

Children’s entertainers, street performers, live music, dancing, food, and more, from 12:00 noon.

Live music on our outdoor stage from 3:00 to 10:00pm featuring ‘Clann agus Cairde‘, ‘The David Munnelly Band‘ and ‘The Moog 69s‘.

Admission is FREE.
Parking available.

More events to be announced, please check our our website for details!



"The Celtic Harp" by Eliseo Mauas Pinto

Greetings to you all ! ☼

My New Ebook is already published!

Today is a special date, not only because it is Lugnasadh, but also because I am  celebrating  the 25th Anniversary of my first Live Performance along with my Salvi lever harp. 
A memorable date it was indeed, since it was the first time a celtic harp did sound in Buenos Aires; and with which I played by the way, original and arranged traditional tunes as a founding member of the “Poitín” line-up, the first celtic folk group ever established in Argentina. A nice event indeed for the occasion of the celebrations of the Lugnasadh Festival.


So what a worthier way to join this celebration but with the edition of a book about the “Celtic Harp”?…= :o)
 

“The Celtic Harp” is a very interesting quick guide not only approaching to questions regarding the origins of its name, its history and revival, but also to the surviving types,suggested Celtic Harpists and a list of related external links.

A very useful source indeed for all those interested in getting acquainted with this ancient instrument so related to the enchanting music of airs, songs, and jingling dance tunes. 


I hope you will be able to experience with this information much of the same evocative feeling I had while writing the book,the very emotional sense deep rooted in  the everlasting Celtic spirituality of the harp.

More than a compilation of useful information for all those interested in exploring the magical world  of the Celtic harp, this book is almost a labour of love,and my public recognition  for all those pleasant hours it gave to meand the portals I was able to trespass thanks to it .


Therefore the book is for FREE so you may download it thoroughly from this link  my Author’s Page on Smashwords.


I hope you’ve shared my passion and felt the wish to trace the same sacred paths  that lead us to a world of crystal sounds,a world enlightened by the vivid bonfires of love and remembrance of our ancients.


Let the Celtic Spirit keep on flaming on our souls… 
 Bliss and blessings to you all!



About Thormahlen Harps, Hear them played !
July 12, 2012, 1:29 am
Filed under: Celtic Harp, Celtic Instruments
I am flattered to share with you this awesome video about “Thormahlen Harps”. Settled in Oregon, USA, they are makers of  fine and  elegant lever harps available in five models to suit the needs of the player, including the beginning student, the therapeutic musician, the Irish player, the teacher and the professional entertainer. All harps have 34-36 strings with a warm, well defined bass and a brilliant, clear treble that will encourage your playing and enhance your sound. 



Here are some details about Thormahlen Harps and you can hear Sharon Thormahlen play the same tune on the 3 models of harps that we make (The Swan, The Cygnet and The Serenade), made out of a variety of woods (8 harps in all). For more information about our harps, visit http://www.thorharp.com

Here is a list of the harps played on the video clip
1.Maple Cygnet/Spruce, Folk Gut Strings
2.Bubinga Cygnet/redwood veneered Spruce, Folk Gut Strings
3.Koa Swan, Cedar veneered Spruce, Folk Gut Strings
4.Cherry Cygnet, Cedar veneered Spruce, Nylon Strings
5.Walnut Cygnet, Cedar, Folk Gut Strings
6.Cherry Swan, Spruce, Nylon Strings
7.Serenade, Mahogany, Nylon Strings
8.Maple Swan, Spruce, Nylon Strings



Memorable Pics: Historical Bodhran Units Made In Argentina
March 17, 2009, 5:40 pm
Filed under: Celtic Instruments

Bodhran by Miguel Cosentino Cormack (circa 1985)

Bodhran by Miguel Cosentino Cormack (circa 1985)

Large Bodhran by Miguel Cosentino Cormack (circa 1995)

Bodhran by Manuel Castro (circa 1987) with tunable metal rim.

Each head of the above models was made of goatskin, and hereby depicted along with their respective luthiers.
As far as I am concerned this were the first bodhrans ever constructed in Argentina, the models and sticks were based upon photographs and extra musical researchs.


Memorable Pics: Historical Bodhran Units Made In Argentina
March 17, 2009, 5:40 pm
Filed under: Celtic Instruments

Bodhran by Miguel Cosentino Cormack (circa 1985)

Bodhran by Miguel Cosentino Cormack (circa 1985)

Large Bodhran by Miguel Cosentino Cormack (circa 1995)

Bodhran by Manuel Castro (circa 1987) with tunable metal rim.

Each head of the above models was made of goatskin, and hereby depicted along with their respective luthiers.
As far as I am concerned this were the first bodhrans ever constructed in Argentina, the models and sticks were based upon photographs and extra musical researchs.


How to play the bodhran? by Ciaran Carson
March 17, 2009, 5:37 pm
Filed under: Celtic Instruments

How to play the bodhran? (excerpted from the book “Irish Traditional Music” by Ciaran Carson © 1986 First published and printed by The Appletree Press Ltd)

If you really want to play the bodhran, it would do no harm to observe the following guidelines:

Familiarise yourself as thoroughly as possible with the music before approaching within smelling distance of a goat-skin.

If you can, learn other instrument besides the bodhran. At the very least, you should be able to lilt a selection of about fifty tunes in varying tempos.

If you want to join in a session, ask the other musicians first, or wait until you are asked. This common courtesy should be observed by all musicians, but bodhran players seem to ignore it more than most.

If there is already a bodhran player in the session, forget about it.

If, after the requisite amount of hard work and sensitive listening, your playing is acceptable to other musicians, don´t be afraid to express yourself. The obverse of the ignorant and insensitive is the paranoiac and guilt-ridden player who cannot enjoy himself for fear of spoiling others’ enjoyment.

If you must play the bodhran, then play it.



How to play the bodhran? by Ciaran Carson
March 17, 2009, 5:37 pm
Filed under: Celtic Instruments

How to play the bodhran? (excerpted from the book “Irish Traditional Music” by Ciaran Carson © 1986 First published and printed by The Appletree Press Ltd)

If you really want to play the bodhran, it would do no harm to observe the following guidelines:

Familiarise yourself as thoroughly as possible with the music before approaching within smelling distance of a goat-skin.

If you can, learn other instrument besides the bodhran. At the very least, you should be able to lilt a selection of about fifty tunes in varying tempos.

If you want to join in a session, ask the other musicians first, or wait until you are asked. This common courtesy should be observed by all musicians, but bodhran players seem to ignore it more than most.

If there is already a bodhran player in the session, forget about it.

If, after the requisite amount of hard work and sensitive listening, your playing is acceptable to other musicians, don´t be afraid to express yourself. The obverse of the ignorant and insensitive is the paranoiac and guilt-ridden player who cannot enjoy himself for fear of spoiling others’ enjoyment.

If you must play the bodhran, then play it.