Celticsprite’s Blog


Browsing The Halloween
October 31, 2008, 3:12 pm
Filed under: Celtic Culture

Hi to all! Merry Celtic New Year!…as the like of a hide and seek… I decided not to compose a review but to browse the web in search of data related to our celtic Samhain…”End of Summer,” a pastoral and agricultural “fire festival” or feast, when the dead revisited the mortal world and large communal bonfires would hence be lit to ward off evil spirits. I hit up by chance…and this is quite accurate to my believes and conceptions …
http://www.loc.gov/folklife/halloween.html …The Fantasy and Folklore of All Hallows by Jack Santino
“Halloween had its beginnings in an ancient, pre-Christian Celtic festival of the dead. The Celtic peoples, who were once found all over Europe, divided the year by four major holidays. According to their calendar, the year began on a day corresponding to November 1st on our present calendar. The date marked the beginning of winter. Since they were pastoral people, it was a time when cattle and sheep had to be moved to closer pastures and all livestock had to be secured for the winter months. Crops were harvested and stored. The date marked both an ending and a beginning in an eternal cycle.
The festival observed at this time was called Samhain (pronounced Sah-ween). It was the biggest and most significant holiday of the Celtic year. The Celts believed that at the time of Samhain, more so than any other time of the year, the ghosts of the dead were able to mingle with the living, because at Samhain the souls of those who had died during the year traveled into the otherworld. People gathered to sacrifice animals, fruits, and vegetables. They also lit bonfires in honor of the dead, to aid them on their journey, and to keep them away from the living. On that day all manner of beings were abroad: ghosts, fairies, and demons–all part of the dark and dread.
Samhain became the Halloween we are familiar with when Christian missionaries attempted to change the religious practices of the Celtic people. In the early centuries of the first millennium A.D., before missionaries such as St. Patrick and St. Columcille converted them to Christianity, the Celts practiced an elaborate religion through their priestly caste, the Druids, who were priests, poets, scientists and scholars all at once. As religious leaders, ritual specialists, and bearers of learning, the Druids were not unlike the very missionaries and monks who were to Christianize their people and brand them evil devil worshippers.
As a result of their efforts to wipe out “pagan” holidays, such as Samhain, the Christians succeeded in effecting major transformations in it. In 601 A.D. Pope Gregory the First issued a now famous edict to his missionaries concerning the native beliefs and customs of the peoples he hoped to convert. Rather than try to obliterate native peoples’ customs and beliefs, the pope instructed his missionaries to use them: if a group of people worshipped a tree, rather than cut it down, he advised them to consecrate it to Christ and allow its continued worship.
In terms of spreading Christianity, this was a brilliant concept and it became a basic approach used in Catholic missionary work. Church holy days were purposely set to coincide with native holy days. Christmas, for instance, was assigned the arbitrary date of December 25th because it corresponded with the mid-winter celebration of many peoples. Likewise, St. John’s Day was set on the summer solstice.
Samhain, with its emphasis on the supernatural, was decidedly pagan. While missionaries identified their holy days with those observed by the Celts, they branded the earlier religion’s supernatural deities as evil, and associated them with the devil. As representatives of the rival religion, Druids were considered evil worshippers of devilish or demonic gods and spirits. The Celtic underworld inevitably became identified with the Christian Hell.
The effects of this policy were to diminish but not totally eradicate the beliefs in the traditional gods. Celtic belief in supernatural creatures persisted, while the church made deliberate attempts to define them as being not merely dangerous, but malicious. Followers of the old religion went into hiding and were branded as witches.
The Christian feast of All Saints was assigned to November 1st. The day honored every Christian saint, especially those that did not otherwise have a special day devoted to them. This feast day was meant to substitute for Samhain, to draw the devotion of the Celtic peoples, and, finally, to replace it forever. That did not happen, but the traditional Celtic deities diminished in status, becoming fairies or leprechauns of more recent traditions.
The old beliefs associated with Samhain never died out entirely. The powerful symbolism of the traveling dead was too strong, and perhaps too basic to the human psyche, to be satisfied with the new, more abstract Catholic feast honoring saints. Recognizing that something that would subsume the original energy of Samhain was necessary, the church tried again to supplant it with a Christian feast day in the 9th century. This time it established November 2nd as All Souls Day–a day when the living prayed for the souls of all the dead. But, once again, the practice of retaining traditional customs while attempting to redefine them had a sustaining effect: the traditional beliefs and customs lived on, in new guises.
All Saints Day, otherwise known as All Hallows (hallowed means sanctified or holy), continued the ancient Celtic traditions. The evening prior to the day was the time of the most intense activity, both human and supernatural. People continued to celebrate All Hallows Eve as a time of the wandering dead, but the supernatural beings were now thought to be evil. The folk continued to propitiate those spirits (and their masked impersonators) by setting out gifts of food and drink. Subsequently, All Hallows Eve became Hallow Evening, which became Hallowe’en–an ancient Celtic, pre-Christian New Year’s Day in contemporary dress.
Many supernatural creatures became associated with All Hallows. In Ireland fairies were numbered among the legendary creatures who roamed on Halloween. An old folk ballad called “Allison Gross” tells the story of how the fairy queen saved a man from a witch’s spell on Halloween.

O Allison Gross, that lives in yon tower
the ugliest witch int he North Country…
She’s turned me into an ugly worm
and gard me toddle around a tree…
But as it fell out last Hallow even
When the seely [fairy] court was riding by,
the Queen lighted down on a gowany bank
Not far from the tree where I wont to lie…
She’s change me again to my own proper shape
And I no more toddle about the tree.

In old England cakes were made for the wandering souls, and people went “a’ soulin'” for these “soul cakes.” Halloween, a time of magic, also became a day of divination, with a host of magical beliefs: for instance, if persons hold a mirror on Halloween and walk backwards down the stairs to the basement, the face that appears in the mirror will be their next lover.
Virtually all present Halloween traditions can be traced to the ancient Celtic day of the dead. Halloween is a holiday of many mysterious customs, but each one has a history, or at least a story behind it. The wearing of costumes, for instance, and roaming from door to door demanding treats can be traced to the Celtic period and the first few centuries of the Christian era, when it was thought that the souls of the dead were out and around, along with fairies, witches, and demons. Offerings of food and drink were left out to placate them. As the centuries wore on, people began dressing like these dreadful creatures, performing antics in exchange for food and drink. This practice is called mumming, from which the practice of trick-or-treating evolved. To this day, witches, ghosts, and skeleton figures of the dead are among the favorite disguises. Halloween also retains some features that harken back to the original harvest holiday of Samhain, such as the customs of bobbing for apples and carving vegetables, as well as the fruits, nuts, and spices cider associated with the day.
Today Halloween is becoming once again and adult holiday or masquerade, like mardi Gras Men and women in every disguise imaginable are taking to the streets of big American cities and parading past grinningly carved, candlelit jack o’lanterns, re- enacting customs with a lengthy pedigree। Their masked antics challenge, mock, tease, and appease the dread forces of the night, of the soul, and of the otherworld that becomes our world on this night of reversible possibilities, inverted roles, and transcendency. In so doing, they are reaffirming death and its place as a part of life in an exhilarating celebration of a holy and magic evening. “

For those interested in tradition and history on Celtic Countries take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samhain

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Browsing The Halloween
October 31, 2008, 3:12 pm
Filed under: Celtic Culture

Hi to all! Merry Celtic New Year!…as the like of a hide and seek… I decided not to compose a review but to browse the web in search of data related to our celtic Samhain…”End of Summer,” a pastoral and agricultural “fire festival” or feast, when the dead revisited the mortal world and large communal bonfires would hence be lit to ward off evil spirits. I hit up by chance…and this is quite accurate to my believes and conceptions …
http://www.loc.gov/folklife/halloween.html …The Fantasy and Folklore of All Hallows by Jack Santino
“Halloween had its beginnings in an ancient, pre-Christian Celtic festival of the dead. The Celtic peoples, who were once found all over Europe, divided the year by four major holidays. According to their calendar, the year began on a day corresponding to November 1st on our present calendar. The date marked the beginning of winter. Since they were pastoral people, it was a time when cattle and sheep had to be moved to closer pastures and all livestock had to be secured for the winter months. Crops were harvested and stored. The date marked both an ending and a beginning in an eternal cycle.
The festival observed at this time was called Samhain (pronounced Sah-ween). It was the biggest and most significant holiday of the Celtic year. The Celts believed that at the time of Samhain, more so than any other time of the year, the ghosts of the dead were able to mingle with the living, because at Samhain the souls of those who had died during the year traveled into the otherworld. People gathered to sacrifice animals, fruits, and vegetables. They also lit bonfires in honor of the dead, to aid them on their journey, and to keep them away from the living. On that day all manner of beings were abroad: ghosts, fairies, and demons–all part of the dark and dread.
Samhain became the Halloween we are familiar with when Christian missionaries attempted to change the religious practices of the Celtic people. In the early centuries of the first millennium A.D., before missionaries such as St. Patrick and St. Columcille converted them to Christianity, the Celts practiced an elaborate religion through their priestly caste, the Druids, who were priests, poets, scientists and scholars all at once. As religious leaders, ritual specialists, and bearers of learning, the Druids were not unlike the very missionaries and monks who were to Christianize their people and brand them evil devil worshippers.
As a result of their efforts to wipe out “pagan” holidays, such as Samhain, the Christians succeeded in effecting major transformations in it. In 601 A.D. Pope Gregory the First issued a now famous edict to his missionaries concerning the native beliefs and customs of the peoples he hoped to convert. Rather than try to obliterate native peoples’ customs and beliefs, the pope instructed his missionaries to use them: if a group of people worshipped a tree, rather than cut it down, he advised them to consecrate it to Christ and allow its continued worship.
In terms of spreading Christianity, this was a brilliant concept and it became a basic approach used in Catholic missionary work. Church holy days were purposely set to coincide with native holy days. Christmas, for instance, was assigned the arbitrary date of December 25th because it corresponded with the mid-winter celebration of many peoples. Likewise, St. John’s Day was set on the summer solstice.
Samhain, with its emphasis on the supernatural, was decidedly pagan. While missionaries identified their holy days with those observed by the Celts, they branded the earlier religion’s supernatural deities as evil, and associated them with the devil. As representatives of the rival religion, Druids were considered evil worshippers of devilish or demonic gods and spirits. The Celtic underworld inevitably became identified with the Christian Hell.
The effects of this policy were to diminish but not totally eradicate the beliefs in the traditional gods. Celtic belief in supernatural creatures persisted, while the church made deliberate attempts to define them as being not merely dangerous, but malicious. Followers of the old religion went into hiding and were branded as witches.
The Christian feast of All Saints was assigned to November 1st. The day honored every Christian saint, especially those that did not otherwise have a special day devoted to them. This feast day was meant to substitute for Samhain, to draw the devotion of the Celtic peoples, and, finally, to replace it forever. That did not happen, but the traditional Celtic deities diminished in status, becoming fairies or leprechauns of more recent traditions.
The old beliefs associated with Samhain never died out entirely. The powerful symbolism of the traveling dead was too strong, and perhaps too basic to the human psyche, to be satisfied with the new, more abstract Catholic feast honoring saints. Recognizing that something that would subsume the original energy of Samhain was necessary, the church tried again to supplant it with a Christian feast day in the 9th century. This time it established November 2nd as All Souls Day–a day when the living prayed for the souls of all the dead. But, once again, the practice of retaining traditional customs while attempting to redefine them had a sustaining effect: the traditional beliefs and customs lived on, in new guises.
All Saints Day, otherwise known as All Hallows (hallowed means sanctified or holy), continued the ancient Celtic traditions. The evening prior to the day was the time of the most intense activity, both human and supernatural. People continued to celebrate All Hallows Eve as a time of the wandering dead, but the supernatural beings were now thought to be evil. The folk continued to propitiate those spirits (and their masked impersonators) by setting out gifts of food and drink. Subsequently, All Hallows Eve became Hallow Evening, which became Hallowe’en–an ancient Celtic, pre-Christian New Year’s Day in contemporary dress.
Many supernatural creatures became associated with All Hallows. In Ireland fairies were numbered among the legendary creatures who roamed on Halloween. An old folk ballad called “Allison Gross” tells the story of how the fairy queen saved a man from a witch’s spell on Halloween.

O Allison Gross, that lives in yon tower
the ugliest witch int he North Country…
She’s turned me into an ugly worm
and gard me toddle around a tree…
But as it fell out last Hallow even
When the seely [fairy] court was riding by,
the Queen lighted down on a gowany bank
Not far from the tree where I wont to lie…
She’s change me again to my own proper shape
And I no more toddle about the tree.

In old England cakes were made for the wandering souls, and people went “a’ soulin'” for these “soul cakes.” Halloween, a time of magic, also became a day of divination, with a host of magical beliefs: for instance, if persons hold a mirror on Halloween and walk backwards down the stairs to the basement, the face that appears in the mirror will be their next lover.
Virtually all present Halloween traditions can be traced to the ancient Celtic day of the dead. Halloween is a holiday of many mysterious customs, but each one has a history, or at least a story behind it. The wearing of costumes, for instance, and roaming from door to door demanding treats can be traced to the Celtic period and the first few centuries of the Christian era, when it was thought that the souls of the dead were out and around, along with fairies, witches, and demons. Offerings of food and drink were left out to placate them. As the centuries wore on, people began dressing like these dreadful creatures, performing antics in exchange for food and drink. This practice is called mumming, from which the practice of trick-or-treating evolved. To this day, witches, ghosts, and skeleton figures of the dead are among the favorite disguises. Halloween also retains some features that harken back to the original harvest holiday of Samhain, such as the customs of bobbing for apples and carving vegetables, as well as the fruits, nuts, and spices cider associated with the day.
Today Halloween is becoming once again and adult holiday or masquerade, like mardi Gras Men and women in every disguise imaginable are taking to the streets of big American cities and parading past grinningly carved, candlelit jack o’lanterns, re- enacting customs with a lengthy pedigree। Their masked antics challenge, mock, tease, and appease the dread forces of the night, of the soul, and of the otherworld that becomes our world on this night of reversible possibilities, inverted roles, and transcendency. In so doing, they are reaffirming death and its place as a part of life in an exhilarating celebration of a holy and magic evening. “

For those interested in tradition and history on Celtic Countries take a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samhain



Celtic Heart – Part 3
October 29, 2008, 1:19 pm
Filed under: Celtic Culture

Celtic Heart – Part 3 by Eliseo Mauas Pinto

The Festivals of Fire were powerful and magical days where druids and shamans were predicting the future. This visionary attitude of the druid (council of kings and chiefs of the clan, judge and teacher, philosopher and astronomer, ceremonial and ritual priest) escorted to the versification of the bard have endured in the ‘Aisling’ musical themes of programatic music that accompanied the extensive bardic poems in a society where the written word did not exist for convenience, only the memory was worthy and allowed the survival of rituals and beliefs testimonied in stories of people like Taliesin, Finn McCumhaill and Amerghin, where the ability of the shamans transmutation allowed them to be part of many realities and stock. The ancestral legends have survived through the oral tradition of storytellers and sources of these was that of the monks of the VII Century of our era took on the task of rebuilding under the Christian sagas where the deities often pass through death, real and unreal are mixed in such a way that we dipped in a magical world. It is common on the ancient cultures of the oral tradition, which ensures a fidelity and permanence of memory much larger than the writing. The song is on top form to ensure that privileged. It is the ‘collective memory’ that transcends the territorial scope and enters the common tradition of the Celtic peoples until the boundary of the times. The only writing developed is known as’ Ogham ‘. Employed by the Vate Druids has 22 letters in yew wood sticks for divination and profiles of rock for signaling. The alphabet (mingled with the runic one) was divided into five groups representing the finger.

Bards fulfilled the role of historians and genealogists official level, had inherited from their druid teachers the gift of evoking through words and music. Their instrument was the magic harp and Gaelic moods dominated the three forms: the ‘geantrai’ – cheerful music of the bronze strings – the ‘goltrai’ – the sorrow of the sliver strings – and the ‘suantrai’ – the melancholy of the steel strings -. These effects we even refer to the ‘ragas’ and the origin of the Indo-Celts. A specific case is the “pibroch” in Scotland, hypnotic musical style perfomed yesteryear by bagpipes in battle, which consists of variations on a theme with specific deletion of certain notes like the Indian ragas.

These festivities still persist in different forms. The Shamain is now known by the famous Halloween. The 1st of May has become the modern observance of Beltane, and Christmas introduced by the early Christian Church has replaced the former observance of the Winter Solstice. Festival that celebrates the shortest day of the year and held as’ The Light of King Arthur” who as a Breton messiah is supposed to have been born in Tintagel by that date.

The transition to the Winter is the time in which the mortal and the souls of the dead move freely within this and the Other World (simple transition of the real with the unreal, an area still passable for the living as references to the fantastic rescue songs and legends). Days of easy prediction for the Druids, the last breath of summer. Unlimited time of festivities, dance and celebration. Release time, the dispossession of fears and burdens, like the trees were stripped of leaves. News commented that there was already a belief that the human soul is immortal. Unlike the Pythagorean doctrine of reincarnation, the druidism has professed that the individual identity is extended into a new human body and so on in others. It also was not considered as punishment but as a pattern of existence. In fact many Celtic heroes are earthly representation of ancient gods. In many ways the mythical and ritual loses the link of the temporal world with the human spirit. Under the spell of Celtic storytellers, the transcending of the mundane and the impossible becomes true in a magical world. The point of encounter with the ‘Other World’ is manifold. Can be located in the middle ‘low’ in Ireland, in a country under the ground, or into the hills of fairies. It is also ‘the country under the wave’, an island or a series of islands under the sea. Those who transit through this world challeng the mundane times, in the morning everything disappears, and their homes re-located in future years.

Thus the lives of men run parallel as the holy cycles of nature. The sacrifice of the New Year Mistletoe is celebrated on the 6th day of the moon by the Druid Orders like yesteryear. Even in winter, the perennial green mistletoe symbolizes the immortality of the human soul. In addition to creating talismans as the famous Egg’s Serpent, experts were also herbalists, picking ceremonial rites with other plants, in addition to the mistletoe, like verbena.

In the spiritual plane of the early Celtic Christianity, the most outstanding feature is the asceticism practiced by monks and “saints”. The Celtic hermits pilgrimage to the most remote forests and lonely islands to gain salvation in their own way. Had an intimate affection for wildlife and nature, perhaps Christians parallels with the life of Francis of Assisi.

Yet the Christian chroniclers could not avoid suggestive gnostical wisdom of the Druids. As with some reference to St. Patrick (who was assigned to the evangelization of Ireland in the year 432 of our era) where you ask a pagan Celtic hero: “What is it that nurtures life?”, Which responds “The truth is that in our heart, the strength in our arms, our compliance in those.”

Without a doubt we can conclude that the testimonies left by the Celts in their wake unveil them as a people with a unique identity and magic, good and distant in their early Mediterranean culture. Their ´personality, art, and environment conception show us a distinguishable soul from other peoples of antiquity. A heart forever Celtic.



Celtic Heart – Part 3
October 29, 2008, 1:19 pm
Filed under: Celtic Culture

Celtic Heart – Part 3 by Eliseo Mauas Pinto

The Festivals of Fire were powerful and magical days where druids and shamans were predicting the future. This visionary attitude of the druid (council of kings and chiefs of the clan, judge and teacher, philosopher and astronomer, ceremonial and ritual priest) escorted to the versification of the bard have endured in the ‘Aisling’ musical themes of programatic music that accompanied the extensive bardic poems in a society where the written word did not exist for convenience, only the memory was worthy and allowed the survival of rituals and beliefs testimonied in stories of people like Taliesin, Finn McCumhaill and Amerghin, where the ability of the shamans transmutation allowed them to be part of many realities and stock. The ancestral legends have survived through the oral tradition of storytellers and sources of these was that of the monks of the VII Century of our era took on the task of rebuilding under the Christian sagas where the deities often pass through death, real and unreal are mixed in such a way that we dipped in a magical world. It is common on the ancient cultures of the oral tradition, which ensures a fidelity and permanence of memory much larger than the writing. The song is on top form to ensure that privileged. It is the ‘collective memory’ that transcends the territorial scope and enters the common tradition of the Celtic peoples until the boundary of the times. The only writing developed is known as’ Ogham ‘. Employed by the Vate Druids has 22 letters in yew wood sticks for divination and profiles of rock for signaling. The alphabet (mingled with the runic one) was divided into five groups representing the finger.

Bards fulfilled the role of historians and genealogists official level, had inherited from their druid teachers the gift of evoking through words and music. Their instrument was the magic harp and Gaelic moods dominated the three forms: the ‘geantrai’ – cheerful music of the bronze strings – the ‘goltrai’ – the sorrow of the sliver strings – and the ‘suantrai’ – the melancholy of the steel strings -. These effects we even refer to the ‘ragas’ and the origin of the Indo-Celts. A specific case is the “pibroch” in Scotland, hypnotic musical style perfomed yesteryear by bagpipes in battle, which consists of variations on a theme with specific deletion of certain notes like the Indian ragas.

These festivities still persist in different forms. The Shamain is now known by the famous Halloween. The 1st of May has become the modern observance of Beltane, and Christmas introduced by the early Christian Church has replaced the former observance of the Winter Solstice. Festival that celebrates the shortest day of the year and held as’ The Light of King Arthur” who as a Breton messiah is supposed to have been born in Tintagel by that date.

The transition to the Winter is the time in which the mortal and the souls of the dead move freely within this and the Other World (simple transition of the real with the unreal, an area still passable for the living as references to the fantastic rescue songs and legends). Days of easy prediction for the Druids, the last breath of summer. Unlimited time of festivities, dance and celebration. Release time, the dispossession of fears and burdens, like the trees were stripped of leaves. News commented that there was already a belief that the human soul is immortal. Unlike the Pythagorean doctrine of reincarnation, the druidism has professed that the individual identity is extended into a new human body and so on in others. It also was not considered as punishment but as a pattern of existence. In fact many Celtic heroes are earthly representation of ancient gods. In many ways the mythical and ritual loses the link of the temporal world with the human spirit. Under the spell of Celtic storytellers, the transcending of the mundane and the impossible becomes true in a magical world. The point of encounter with the ‘Other World’ is manifold. Can be located in the middle ‘low’ in Ireland, in a country under the ground, or into the hills of fairies. It is also ‘the country under the wave’, an island or a series of islands under the sea. Those who transit through this world challeng the mundane times, in the morning everything disappears, and their homes re-located in future years.

Thus the lives of men run parallel as the holy cycles of nature. The sacrifice of the New Year Mistletoe is celebrated on the 6th day of the moon by the Druid Orders like yesteryear. Even in winter, the perennial green mistletoe symbolizes the immortality of the human soul. In addition to creating talismans as the famous Egg’s Serpent, experts were also herbalists, picking ceremonial rites with other plants, in addition to the mistletoe, like verbena.

In the spiritual plane of the early Celtic Christianity, the most outstanding feature is the asceticism practiced by monks and “saints”. The Celtic hermits pilgrimage to the most remote forests and lonely islands to gain salvation in their own way. Had an intimate affection for wildlife and nature, perhaps Christians parallels with the life of Francis of Assisi.

Yet the Christian chroniclers could not avoid suggestive gnostical wisdom of the Druids. As with some reference to St. Patrick (who was assigned to the evangelization of Ireland in the year 432 of our era) where you ask a pagan Celtic hero: “What is it that nurtures life?”, Which responds “The truth is that in our heart, the strength in our arms, our compliance in those.”

Without a doubt we can conclude that the testimonies left by the Celts in their wake unveil them as a people with a unique identity and magic, good and distant in their early Mediterranean culture. Their ´personality, art, and environment conception show us a distinguishable soul from other peoples of antiquity. A heart forever Celtic.



Celtic Heart – Part 2
October 28, 2008, 12:29 pm
Filed under: Celtic Culture

Celtic Heart – Part 2 by Eliseo Mauas Pinto

The music has evolved in this particular conception of the environment, turning with each annual cycle of thirteen months and thirteen moons, each month with its own deity and alphabet tree. It should be noted here that it is particularly difficult to find a Celtic melody that has a greater range to thirteen notes.

These older calendar systems, based on the natural rhythms of the stars,have enabled the Celtic people to live in harmony with the pulse of nature. Each seasonal change is celebrated by a Festival of Fire in three days: before, during, and at the start of the season in question. The time is measured not by their nights and their days but dividing the calendar month and a half in a brilliant and half dark. The alternation of day and night, light and dark, says a fundamental duality, as the death of the night is interpreted as closer to another world that the light of day. A person who is born at night have the power to make contact with faerie people and wondering souls Many of them do not develop activities at night for fear of recognizing relatives and friends.

The ancient beliefs say they should not be whistling on the outskirts of the houses or call the children by their own name.

Many tunes, songs, films and legends and even make reference to the diminutive people, fairies, and characters from the mythical faerie world. It is worth nothing here that for the Celt world is too unpredictable and magic, governed by invisible and supernatural forces. Every rock, tree and river, has its spirits and strength of will associated with it. Highly superstitious, is quite careful with their environment, because they feared disruption to natural forces and even being captured by these descendants of ancient deities.

The dolmens and menhirs – mute testimony to the passage of past cultures, if not beyond a role with the dead, are regarded as astral observatories located on electromagnetic lines underground and so-called ‘blind sources’ that are spirals, arches and twin patterns very common on Celtic engravings

The sites “on the limit” are also part of the magical Celtic cosmogony. Celtic people were considered barbaric by the Romans and pagans by modern Christianity, has lived fascinated by places such as coastlines, fords, or thresholds; sites that are neither one nor the other hand, going to be places of power. The shore is not even land or sea, it is still a combination of both, considering the land as representing our world and solid material, and the sea as representing the spiritual world. Another important ritual element is the ‘dew’, valuable for its virtue of prolonging beauty of those maids who bathe in it at dawn (not byday nor night), certainly is neither rain nor river, nor sea water or a well. Does not appear either from above or from the land. In the same way the aforementioned ‘mistletoe’, parasit plant that is neither shrub nor tree, and even more so grows from the ground. The ‘labyrinth’ is also considered as site of power and path through which pass the souls to the Other World. Passage through them does not lead anywhere in particular but in doing so there is always the chance of reaching the desired goal. In truth, the adventurers featured on the “travelling” legends usually arrive at their destination just after losing the track.

It is impossible to delimitate the boundaries of the Other World in terms of direction and distance, for some is beyond the horizon indeed invisible around us. More curious still in the legend of Bran ‘The Plain of Delight’ the boundaries of the sea and land are erased. Is the land of truth, peace, and eternal life, where coexist superlative ambivalences like beautiful maidens and evil witches,charming fairies and horrible ogres



Celtic Heart – Part 2
October 28, 2008, 12:29 pm
Filed under: Celtic Culture

Celtic Heart – Part 2 by Eliseo Mauas Pinto

The music has evolved in this particular conception of the environment, turning with each annual cycle of thirteen months and thirteen moons, each month with its own deity and alphabet tree. It should be noted here that it is particularly difficult to find a Celtic melody that has a greater range to thirteen notes.

These older calendar systems, based on the natural rhythms of the stars,have enabled the Celtic people to live in harmony with the pulse of nature. Each seasonal change is celebrated by a Festival of Fire in three days: before, during, and at the start of the season in question. The time is measured not by their nights and their days but dividing the calendar month and a half in a brilliant and half dark. The alternation of day and night, light and dark, says a fundamental duality, as the death of the night is interpreted as closer to another world that the light of day. A person who is born at night have the power to make contact with faerie people and wondering souls Many of them do not develop activities at night for fear of recognizing relatives and friends.

The ancient beliefs say they should not be whistling on the outskirts of the houses or call the children by their own name.

Many tunes, songs, films and legends and even make reference to the diminutive people, fairies, and characters from the mythical faerie world. It is worth nothing here that for the Celt world is too unpredictable and magic, governed by invisible and supernatural forces. Every rock, tree and river, has its spirits and strength of will associated with it. Highly superstitious, is quite careful with their environment, because they feared disruption to natural forces and even being captured by these descendants of ancient deities.

The dolmens and menhirs – mute testimony to the passage of past cultures, if not beyond a role with the dead, are regarded as astral observatories located on electromagnetic lines underground and so-called ‘blind sources’ that are spirals, arches and twin patterns very common on Celtic engravings

The sites “on the limit” are also part of the magical Celtic cosmogony. Celtic people were considered barbaric by the Romans and pagans by modern Christianity, has lived fascinated by places such as coastlines, fords, or thresholds; sites that are neither one nor the other hand, going to be places of power. The shore is not even land or sea, it is still a combination of both, considering the land as representing our world and solid material, and the sea as representing the spiritual world. Another important ritual element is the ‘dew’, valuable for its virtue of prolonging beauty of those maids who bathe in it at dawn (not byday nor night), certainly is neither rain nor river, nor sea water or a well. Does not appear either from above or from the land. In the same way the aforementioned ‘mistletoe’, parasit plant that is neither shrub nor tree, and even more so grows from the ground. The ‘labyrinth’ is also considered as site of power and path through which pass the souls to the Other World. Passage through them does not lead anywhere in particular but in doing so there is always the chance of reaching the desired goal. In truth, the adventurers featured on the “travelling” legends usually arrive at their destination just after losing the track.

It is impossible to delimitate the boundaries of the Other World in terms of direction and distance, for some is beyond the horizon indeed invisible around us. More curious still in the legend of Bran ‘The Plain of Delight’ the boundaries of the sea and land are erased. Is the land of truth, peace, and eternal life, where coexist superlative ambivalences like beautiful maidens and evil witches,charming fairies and horrible ogres



Celtic Heart – Part 1
October 27, 2008, 4:06 pm
Filed under: Celtic Culture


CELTIC HEART – Part 1 by Eliseo Mauas Pinto

Since the days when the Bardic Orders arose in Great Britain & Ireland, the Celtic soul has found its true expression in music. In the echoe of the old bagpipes, the magic sound of the Gaelic harp & evocative ballads, lies the heart of the Celtic tradition, its spirit and dreams Music, art that goes directly to the senses is charging a special energy when it flows from the instruments used by these people.
Folk music ‘or’ world music , which simply acknowledge the Countries of the green and the wind, the sea cliffs of bristly, forests and mountains, clear land on whose soil megaliths stand as mute witnesses of a past still alive and whose reality is between history and legend. We can not say that the primary requirement is to be a Celtic descendant in order to perceive these feelings, just be ready to vibrate with this genre of music whose roots have led to several modern styles developed by the Celts at any place in the world. They recognize their influence on Bluegrass, the Progressive Folk, the Celto New Age, the Funky Fling, the Folk Rock, or the recent Afro Celt. Who ever predisposed to the deeply spiritual, melancholic, or mysterious, it has not associate the bagpipes are an enigmatic figure with a Highlander wandering the Highlands of Scotland at sunrise An ancient spell is entwined in their melodies which enchantment that immerses us in the spiral of Celtic folk dances or the melancholy of a song that tears at the tragic stories of people lived by a singular. There is a belief that the term ‘Celtic’ carries the notion of ‘mysticism’ and the special relationship disseminated by the lively musical ‘New Age’ with Celtic has unleashed a discussion about a genre ‘Celto-new age’ orinfluence of such migratory flows.

Celtic people still keep dances today with a circular motion as a leader who sings interrogating axis from the center and the dancers answer around. A rock engraving (ca. 800 BC) near Cogul in Catalonia, described women dancing around a central male figure. The ancient Celts measurable spirals in their cosmogony, in wheels, the movement of stars, the rising and the twilight of the sun and the moon. These concepts reflected in the Celtic knots that populate rocks, miniature books and jewelry, symbolizing the creation and spinning of the stars in the sky. The ‘triskell’ three-pointed symbol of positive turn, is the representation of the sun and the cycle of life. Coincident with a belief in the reconciliation of three independent entities that involve the discovery of the point at which match domain Vates and heroes.
You may find a magical tradition based on the beliefs and rituals of the shaman, the mystic tradition of the Unity, rooted in the spiritual philosophy of the pre-Christian Europe: a reverential worship of mother earth, the belief in an all-powerful life force that is part of living matter in the Universe, the role of man as guardian of life existing on Earth.

The seasons are changing and returning each year which points plotted on a giant wheel and the stars roll over our spot on the axis pass the North Star. Some clans thought that it could be the Land of Youth (something akin to Christian Paradise) and the apparent motion of stars in circle formed a spiral path by which the souls stood in the Other Life. Spirals of continuous positive turn with no beginning and no end seeming to suggest a course is always when starting culminates another. Her continuous motion expansive symbolizes the constant evolution of wisdom and knowledge
Many Celtic dances are circular and some as the ‘reel’ in the opposite direction to rotate clockwise, something considered heretical by the then Queen Elizabeth of England, who ironically danced in his court were to somehow Celtic jig, immersed in a society that doesn’t conceive a schedule of thirteen months.